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Hello and welcome to my blog. On the 31st July 2014 I was diagnosed with Young onset dementia. I may not have much of a short-term memory anymore but that date is one I’ll never forget.

Me - 59 years young with my wonderful daughters:)
Me – 59 years young with my wonderful daughters:)

I’m 62 years young, live happily alone in Yorkshire, have 2 daughters and I continued to work full time in the NHS until the end of March 2015, when I chose to take early retirement to enable me to enjoy being me while I’m able. I have never ‘tweeted’, ‘blogged’ or ‘facebooked’ in my life but since I was diagnosed, everything else in my life has changed, so why not this. I hope you find my ramblings of interest.

I started this blog to allow me, in the first instance, to write all my thoughts before they’re lost. Luckily the part of my brain that allows me to type hasn’t broken yet and I find that easier than talking. I have calendars that take care of the future but this blog serves as a reminder of what I’ve done and said in the past – it now serves as my memory. If anyone chooses to follow my ramblings it will serve as a way of raising awareness.

It will hopefully convey the helplessness of those diagnosed with dementia, as there is no cure – the end is inevitable. However, I’m also hoping I can convey that, although we’ve been diagnosed, people like me still have a substantial contribution to make; we still have a sense of humour; we still have feelings. I’m hoping to show the reality of trying to cope on a day-to-day basis with the ever-changing environment that dementia throws at those diagnosed with the condition. Living as well as you can with dementia is all about adapting. Adapting to new ways to enable us to live better for longer with dementia.

I can type as though dementia never entered my world as that part of my brain has not yet been affected, but that often works against me as people question my diagnosis. All I can say is, live a day in my shoes and I’m sure the reality will dawn.

What I want is not sympathy. What I want is simply to raise awareness.

I’m now the proud author of the Sunday Times Best Seller, Somebody I Used to Know, which just goes to show, you should never give up on yourself.

Click on the ‘Blogs’ tab to see what you’ve missed and then click to ‘follow’ me if you’d like to receive my daily blogs in your inbox.

If you prefer to comment by email please feel free – wendy7713@icloud.com or you can find me on Twitter   @WendyPMitchell

Billy, my daughter's cat - a calming influence in my life.
Billy, my daughter’s cat – a calming influence in my life.

 

 

524 thoughts on “Home

  1. Hi Wendy. A friend passed me your book to read and I have just finished. Such an inspirational read. My Mum is 89 and in a Care Home and has been living with Alzheimer’s for over 5 years. It robbed her of her independence after a fall and has been in care for 2 years. Your book has helped me understand what she has experienced. I take my hat off to you for your positivity in keeping this disease at bay and I hope you are still doing well.

    Liked by 2 people

      1. Hi Wendy my daughter in laws mum was diagnosed with early on set Dementia at the same age as you her family were in denial it has progressed very rapidly and now she is in a care home for high Secuity. She (Gael) has very little communication now as it’s always a struggle for her, you can see in her eyes how frustrated she gets trying to get through the fog. I visit Gael everyday as her daughter gets upset and can’t stand to see her mum like this. I read your book and you are an inspiration to all who have this awful disease Thank you

        Liked by 1 person

  2. I read “Still Alice” a few years ago and was convinced I had the signs of early onset dementia. My 30 year old daughter also read it and thought she had the signs too, so I suspect I might have been overreacting. Nonetheless it ignited my interest in the subject and I started following your blog and have just finished your book. A few months into your blog, the penny dropped that the names seemed familiar and it was Billy the cat who clinched it…I bought Stuart’s old house and have lived here for the past 4 years! Anyway I am digressing, because what I wanted to say is how inspirational you are and when I am finally diagnosed with dementia, I hope it will be a slow progression which will give me the time to put in place some of the strategies you have thought of…and to remind myself that it is a beginning of a new life. Thank you. xx

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  3. Dear Wendy
    I have just finished your book on my kindle and plan to go and buy the hard copy for my husband and mother in law to read. My father in law has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s but he is 87 years young so in a slightly different place, especially as his mobility is already very impaired.I read your book hoping to get some insight into how to help my father in law and feel I have learned a great deal. Not least that I now realise my dear Mum, who passed away last year, also had dementia but I didn’t see it at the time. I am in awe of your courage and wish you all the very best. I have made lots of notes, in particular one that says “living with dementia”not “suffering from”. I plan to do more research to help my father in law feel that his life isn’t over.
    Many thanks for your positive can do attitude.
    Ginny

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Dear Wendy,

    Although we have never met, the frankness of your book makes me feel that I know something about you.

    You continue to battle the disease with which you have been inflicted with a remarkable strength of character, turning a negative situation on its head and producing an autobiography that will educate and enlighten for generations.

    Your book is a gift not only to Alzheimer’s survivors and their carers but for everyone. It teaches us to make the most of all the love and beauty in our lives, because we will never know when we may loose it.

    Stuart

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Dear Wendy,Have. Just finished your book and found it very helpful.My husband has frontal lobe and vascular dementia.I suspect he has developed it over a number of years.At times his behaviour was quite puzzling.At this time he is in a care home,as I had reached a point that I could not give him the care he needed.He also has a heart problem and diabetes.Feel guilty at times for putting him in care,but know he is in the hands of caring people,he is 76.Again,thank you for you wonderful book,and may you continue in the way that you have to be an inspiration to others.God Bless

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s very kind of you Elaine, thank you. You mustn’t feel guilty – it now means you’re more able to enjoy the time when you do see him and not be exhausted.xx

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    2. Hello Elaine my situation is exactly the same as yours but my husband is only 66 and in full time care. I have the same feelings as you but I’ve been inspired to try to find as many things as possible for us to do together. Although it’s not PETE inside he still looks like the man I married 45 years ago. The disease is horrible but we have live each day as it comes and stay strong.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Dear Wendy couldn’t leave your book down .l am a nurse over 30yrs and since my uncle developed Alzheimer’s l have taken a huge interest and fascination with it . I travelled his journey with him and l found there wasn’t a lot out there for people with dementia/Alzheimer’s and also for their careers,so after all my time spent in the medical unit l am transferring to the Dementia Assessment Unit to hopefully help make a difference in some way to bring more awareness of this disease and help loved ones and their family member cope better. Anyway l hope l can do something so looking forward to following your blog Thankyou for sharing your story and love to your daughters God bless Cecilia x

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Hello Wendy, I first saw you in an interview on calendar news and after listening to your story I decided to treat myself to your book. Congratulations….what a wonderful, inspirational and heart warming read, giving others hope that they too can “Live with Dementia” , adapting their life to live a new life alongside the cruel disease. It has prompted me to join Dementia friends and attend an awareness session in my local area, which I am looking forward to with interest. I enlighten myself to you, as the “Old you” a busy mum, working, a sharp memory since my working life began at 16 and Dementia often worries me as I wonder if I will tire my brain out with how hard I work it sometimes, who knows, but one thing I do know now is that it doesn’t seem half as daunting a prospect if you can adapt and learn to live with it.
    I look forward to following your adventures via your blog and wish you all the best.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Dear Wendy. My husband of 76 has Alzheimer’s, but is in a very happy space. However – your book has helped me to understand more of what is – or isn’t! – going on in the brain. It helps to always be positive and to have love and empathy.
    Second time round in my ‘training ‘, as I also looked after my Dad with Cerebral Vascular dementia.
    Your courage is enlightening to so many. Your experience has been a gift to many. Thank you and thinking about you, Sarah and Gemma – and Billy too.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Hi Wendy I have just finished your book, you are a very special lady and an inspiration I am a staff Nurse and work a lot with dementia however, you have gave me so much more understanding into this disease. I hope you remain to continue with all your good work God Bless Angela

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  10. As the wife & carer for my husband who is 86yrs old & recently diagnosed with mixed Dementia, I am trying very hard to understand more about his condition & we are just about to attend the last one of 14 CST group sessions which from my point of view has been very informative & helpful. I have also just finished reading your wonderful book which I intend to donate to the group for future carers to borrow in the hope that they will also enjoy reading it. My thoughts are with you a very remarkable lady & your family ☺ 🐝

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  11. My husband had a small vascular stroke. He was 46. They told him at the hospital he had the brain of a 60 year old man and now has the signs of early onset dementia. Weve found noone to help us here in canada. Nobody is as young as him. Because it was a centrally located bleed he has temperature probllems. As soon as the weather starts warming up he starts to sweat profusely. He obsesses a lot now has bouts of unrealistic anger and accuses people of taking things and moving them when he cant find something. He also gets sudden blotchiness on his face and arms like a rash. If anyone has early onset dementia or had a vascular bleed at a early agr please email me.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I often talk about the advantages of living alone Sharee – if someone moves things in my house they no longer exist and if I find them in a different place it’s very confusing. Outbursts of anger are often simply the only way to express the frustration that goes hand in hand with dementia. The UK has a wonderful website for Young ONset – it might be useful – https://www.youngdementiauk.org/ xx

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  12. Hi Wendy I have just read your book and want to thank you for raising awareness of this disease through your own brave and at times terrifying journey in living with dementia.
    I cried and laughed while reading your experiences and applauded how you dealt with the difficulties .
    Most importantly your insight on living life for the moment even those of us not afflicted should stop and enjoy those moments as no one knows what’s next on this rollercoaster of life.
    Thank you again as I lost my grandmother to dementia a few days after my first grandchild was born. Your insight would have been a wonderful aid in understanding what she was going through. A sense of humour is just as important as the support and strength that you and your daughters have shown through the telling of your story.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Maria – excellent message to Wendy. What an inspiring lady she is. We should all live for the moment and make the most of each and every day. My Dad had CV dementia and my husband now has it, along with a peppering of Alzheimer’s. Penny Garner (SPECAL) and Wendy have both been a huge help to me. Thank you.
      All the very best
      Anna

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Hi Wendy
    I have just finished your book. I have laughed and I have cried. My lovely Mum has had Alzheimer’s for the last 17 years. I am buying your book to give to her care home and another for the hospital that I work at. Thank you. XX

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Dear Wendy I have learnt so much from your wonderful book. I only wish I had been able to access information such as you have so beautifully and freely given six years ago. I know it would have made my mums last few years better because now I understand so much more. Your are brave and amazing and I bet your daughters are too. Love and light, Heather

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Hi Wendy, I really understand your book in fact I do a lot of the same things you do. I worked at York hospital as a HCA for 17 years and loved every minute. I worked with Sarah when she was a student on the short stay ward. I got knocked over on a zebra crossing leaving work after a night shift and had my leg badly broken and had a brain injury (which was not picked up at first) although there was blood coming out my ear etc. I had a ct scan which didn’t show anything but shouldreallyhave had an MRI a few weeks later and never got one. I suffer from very bad memory problems, cognitive difficulties etc. I realise mine will stay static so I feel for you so much and think your an inspiration. Please say hi to Sarah for me she’s a lovely girl. I had no option in the end but to take retirement due to ill health although I managedpart time for a few years but I miss my job so much. I am now doing some volunteer work looking after an elderly gentleman who has had a stroke so his wife can go and have some metime and that helps me a bit. Good luck love.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Great read! My gran has dementia so your book really helped me to understand what she may be experiencing and feeling! You are a true inspiration 👍xx

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Wendy – I’ve just finished reading your book after it came up on my Kindle as ‘selected for you’. I don’t know why I chose to read it as i wasn’t aware of what it was about but now I know that it was meant to be.

    My mother died last March having had to live with dementia and cancer. I never really understood what was happening to her and no one explained. I was at times unable to help and found it hard to deal with. I can see now how much she tried to keep the truth away from me and my younger sister until she no longer had control over it any more and then we were totally useless at helping her. Doctors didn’t diagnose her for a long time saying it was nothing to worry about ‘it’s just a blip’ we were told. If only I’d been able to read about your journey before then I could have done more for her.

    You are an inspiration and, whilst your story is a painful reality of what so many people go through every day living with dementia, I’m in awe of your strength and determination.

    Thank you for sharing your life with such honesty and feeling and I truly wish you and your daughters many more years of joy and laughter along your continuing journey.

    Dawn 😊💖 xx

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  18. Thank you so much for sharing your life.
    I have just finished your book.
    I work in a carehome and many of the people that live there have some form of dementia.
    On a personal level my own mother had vascular dementia and now my father in law has the same diagnosis.
    Lots of things in your book made perfect sense and other things made me stand back and rethink .
    Thank you once again for sharing
    Xx

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Wendy, I bought you book on kindle for no other reason than to gain an insight into dementia and that you did, most eloquently. Fascinating, funny, sad, hopeful and always informative. A real insightful read. Thank you for sharing your experience and helping us to try to understand. I will not forget your wise words.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Hi Wendy
    I have just finished reading your inspirational book. I am constantly researching dementia as I work with people with a disability who also have early onset dementia some at age 30. You have given me a better understanding of the disease and I thank you for that, you are truly an amazing lady. ALL the best to you and your amazing daughters.
    Lyn

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Wendy thank you! I’ve just finished reading your book and I have a whole new understanding of dementia and those living with it. While I don’t currently know anyone with dementia, I now feel capable of interacting with compassion and an awareness I didn’t previously have. Fantastic book!

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Hi Wendy, hope you are well. I found your blog through something a friend shared on Facebook. I have worked in care for only a year now after a big career change. I love it. It’s what I feel I was always meant to do. I’m currently studying for my nvq2 and I think your blog is going to help me so much. Thank you for what you’re doing. Lots of love. Melanie x

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Melanie, so wonderful that you have changed career to work in care. I am thinking of making a similar shift myself as I’m in the corporate world and feel there is something far more rewarding that I could do – which line of care do you work in? My mum lives with dementia and I am now trying to learn how to deal with it as her only child. Wendy’s book has been amazing in learning what people living with dementia really feel and I am now going to absorb all of her blog posts now! Good luck with your NVQ2 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  23. Dear Wendy,

    I have just been on holidays (on a cruise) and took your book with me as my holiday read. I sadly don’t get too much time to read normally but I found myself finding quiet places to hide away in with a coffee or cocktail and your book so I could read in peace and not be worried about the odd tear that crept down my face as I read. My late grandmother had Alzheimer’s and your book gave me a whole new view on this challenging disease. I have vivid memories of the battles my mother had with health professionals 25+ years ago when trying to care for my grandmother at home. There was no Google to refer to, very few support networks and a great deal of misinformation about the hows & whys of treatment and care.
    I want to thank you for sharing your experiences, your candour and your courage. I will be giving my copy of your book to Mum to read tomorrow and will be thinking of you and other who deal with the everyday challenges of dementia this week-end as hubby and I participate in the annual Memory Walk/Jog in support of Dementia Australia. Sending you thanks, best wishes and strength ❤
    Jodie

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Dear Wendy, I am nearly at the end of your book and it is so beautifully written and so inspiring in many ways. My Mum is living with dementia, she is 83yrs old, and as her only daughter I find it very difficult to see my Mum deteriorating before my very eyes. I somehow don’t want to believe it and try to ‘bring her back’ to the here and now. She still does simple things around the home and often sits with her Word Search book but she does little else. Is there anything I could do with her (maybe a puzzle or a game) that could help keep her mind active? Thank you again for sharing your story and allowing us in to your life.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for your kind words Elaine. Your mum probably loves wordsearch because its familiar and something she can still do. You could always take her to sit in different surroundings yet still with her word-search. Everyone is different and its finding those small things. Maybe create a word search that contains happy places,events or people from her past…….hugs to you all🤗xx

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      1. That’s a lovely idea Wendy, thank you. I took her for a picnic in the park a couple of weeks ago and didn’t think to take her WordSearch. I will do that next time. I tried Scrabble with her yesterday but this seemed to prove too much, maybe that is a step too far. Thank you again for creating this blog and sharing your thoughts and achievements. Lots of love to you xx

        Liked by 1 person

  25. Dear Wendy
    I just finished reading your book and I would like to say that you are an inspirational woman. I am impressed by the way you reacted to this event in your life and by the way you took the challenge. There is no dementia, as yet, in my large and aging household, but I am more aware of it and of the ways we can help to make other people’s life a little bit easier. A big virtual hug
    Elena xx

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Dear Wendy,

    I am studying at UEA and I was planning on coming to see you at your book reading in Norwich today. I have just realised that I missed you. I had been waiting so much for today because I think that you are an exceptional woman and I was really looking forward to meeting you. I have worked with people living with dementia and my grandma, who hasn’t been diagnosed, is getting more and more forgetful and confused about things. Your story is very inspirational and I would havr loved to be able to talk about it with you.

    I know that you use reminders on your Ipad. Well I do too because life gets too busy at times and funnily enough, my phone did not remind me about today which I’m quite upset about.

    If you ever go through Norwich or Norfolk again, I would love to be able to meet you.

    Take care of yourself,
    Pauline

    Liked by 2 people

  27. Hi Wendy. I happened across your book perusing the library and am so glad I did. I admire your courage and determination to continue to live an independent and active life and I love how you find alternatives when you reach an obstacle rather than simply giving up. Something we can all learn from, diseased brains or not! Because the book was filled with such positivity and hope, I found that I almost forgot I was reading a book about someone living with dementia. Rather, I read a beautiful story of a mother who, in the face of the struggles of life, made the best choices she could in the interest of two girls so she could raise them to be filled with love, creativity, independence, humor, and work ethic. Having dementia enter the picture, seemed to be tackled the same way everything else in your life was, head on and with determination to figure out a way to deal with it. Such a beautiful reflection of your life and a family of encouragement and support, whether it’s in the face of staying home alone as a child for the first time or being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. As a cyclist, I do have to ask….if you happen to have a picture with your pink bike, I’d sure love to see it! I know you have a tight circle of people to lean on when you need it, but you have an entire world of supporters – you are doing amazing things with your life and changing the world one speech, book, walk downtown, and smile at a time. Keep it up!

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  28. Dear Wendy,

    I have just finished your book. I don’t have dementia and I know no-one who does but, like I suspect an awful lot of people, it has long been a worrying niggle at the back of my mind, every time I can’t think of a word or remember a name “is this the start…”. Since reading your book it’s no longer something I worry about, if it does happen it will be a challenge to fight. I now know that it can be “lived with” that a lot can be done and you don’t need to just give up and wait for the worst.

    I’m sure, without reading all the positive comments here, that you have helped a lot of people both those living with the disease and those caring for them. But I’m also sure that I’m not the only perfectly healthy person you’ve also helped.

    Thank you!

    Jane

    Liked by 2 people

  29. Hi Wendy, thank you so much for writing this book and sharing your life with all of us. I just received it in the mail yesterday and finished it last night. I devoured it so I must read it again only slower. You gave me so much to think about.
    My 88yr old mother had dementia but actually does quite well. She can be left alone several hours, dresses herself, can fix her own ovaltine, has all bodily functions and a great sense of humor! She mostly knows all of her family except sometimes the grandchildren who are changing so much.
    She can’t drive, we have to give her the right pills, make sure she eats and showers are an issue. Why is that? She hates them. My sister lives with her full time, takes wonderful care of her and I am there as much as I can be but live in a different state. She’s happiest when we are both there! My sister keeps her dressed nicely if she’s not in her robe, we get her hair done weekly and her nails done. Also try to get her out to eat. She doesn’t eat much and mainly likes sweets! She sleeps a lot.
    I am wondering if I should talk to her about the dementia and how it makes her feel? Or ask her any questions? I just feel so lost sometimes and don’t know what to say to her.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Sometimes people have found asking ‘what does it feel like having dementia’ gets the conversation started. Preferring sweets is very common as our taste buds change – luckily I like savoury!. I don’t feel hunger any more and food is simply fuel. Showers can be a problem – they’re very complicated! I always make sure I have my favourite smelliest in the shower. Sending hugs.xx

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you so much for your quick response. I always get the water turned on and off for my mom in the shower and stay in the bathroom with her. I think it’s something to do with getting wet!! Although we never wash her hair. She goes to the beauty shop for that! I’m so amazed at what all you are doing. You are my new hero!

        Liked by 2 people

  30. Hi Wendy, I have just finished your truly inspirational book, and I am just full of admiration for you and your lovely girls. Thank you for sharing your life and giving such a positive insight to living with dementia. With Love Liz xxx

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Alzheimer’s illness is common in my family, I have been stressed at work for at least 16years suffered depression my thoughts were blocked. So I knew the need to keep a watch on it, that was when I began to walk several times a week, 2 miles a day and realized that was a positive thing, but it got to a point my whole body started getting weaker, I needed some help. I started up training, the trainer came to my hometown 5 times a week and he told me that would be able to help me. I agreed with him and was happy I finally found solution not until I woke up one day and couldn’t walk. Tried out so many medications and diet but none of them was able to help me. In the process I knew about ZOMO, an herbal medicine for Alzheimer’s disease, I followed the blog address shared; I curiously contacted him and got ZOMO. I didn’t want to be disabled at my old age, and was so hungry for more healthy days on earth. My recovery involved both medicine and diet. I never had any complications I experienced while on English medications why using ZOMO. You may contact Dr. Charanjit via his email. charantova@gmail.com or visit his blog via curetoalzheimer.blogspot.com

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Hi Wendy! I’ve just finished reading your book. Quite appropriate as today is the launch of the Alzheimer’s Society memory walk advert which this year features my Mum and I. Your book is amazing and what you are doing to promote awareness is truly inspirational. So much of what you write resonates. So many familiar situations for my sister and I. I just wish I had read your book when my Mum was still able to communicate and recognise me as there’s so much I could’ve put into practice. Wishing you continued strength. Cx

    Liked by 1 person

  33. Hi Wendy
    I just finished your book, read it in 2 days! My dad was diagnosed with Alzheimers 2 years ago at age 72, like you he was an articulate, fit, switched on cookie who did the Telegrapgh crossword daily. Unlike you he has accepted his decline, and is now unable to do many of the everyday tasks he was used to doing. Your book has really helped me to understand how he must feel, and consider how to help him and my mum, going forward from here.
    You are an amazing lady, and I feel sad that the NHS that I work in has let down dementia patients in the way it does. I will spread the word about your book, because it is a guiding light in how to cope with adversity and not be defeated by a society that is terrified of what they don’t understand.
    I wish you well in continuing with your goals.
    Best wishes and thank you.
    Tiffany North

    Liked by 1 person

  34. I have just finished reading your book. Thank you so much for your insight. I wish I knew what I know now 4-5 years ago for my dad 😞 but you have given me ideas to try still now as I visit my dad in Care. Having a greater understanding of his struggles (even though he is much further along) is helping me…. he doesn’t speak much at all, but you have explained that part so amazing well for me so I now know how to not frustrate him even more. Thank you so much 😊 and your amazing daughters 😊😊

    Liked by 1 person

  35. Hi Wendy, having just finished your book my teenage sons bought me I am inspired and touched by the positive and meaningful approach you have taken to living as the new Wendy.

    As a GP in Australia I have many patients with dementia and my aim is now to explore with them and their loved ones what they CAN do rather than focus on what they can’t. I will also try to ensure they have access and support where available, seeing how vital this has been for you.
    Thank you and wishing you all the best on your journey.

    Liked by 1 person

  36. I finished reading your book this evening. What an inspiration you are. Thank you for sharing your story and everything your doing towards dementia research.

    Liked by 1 person

  37. Wendy, I just finished reading your book and hope to share it with some others. My mother just turned 90 and was diagnosed about 4 years ago with alzheimer’s. I suspect it occurred before that. My father passed away 3.5 years ago and only then did he tell me stories of mom’s violent outbursts towards him. She is in a memory care facility, and I visit her several times a week. I have gone through all of the emotions……….confusion, anger, and lots of guilt. My mother is one of the more adept individuals in her facility. But I’ve learned when there is music playing and if you just take the hands of those individuals (who are otherwise not coherent to anything) and move to the music, you can bring a smile to everyone. I am SO thankful to you for opening my eyes up to the various stages of this disease. You are truly an inspiration! God Bless You, and keep up the good work!

    Liked by 1 person

  38. I really enjoyed your book Wendy, it gave me an insight of a medical condition which I don’t know anything about. There were so many hints and tips as to how to manage interactions with people who have dementia. I never knew how to respond to people who have this condition and this book has given me valuable insight to understand a little bit. My 94 year old mom who lives in a residental home, has a lady with dementia who lives next door. She got into a habit of trying to enter my mom’s room , so your story of walking up the wrong path to the house next door to your own, gave me an understanding of what may have been happening. I also liked your point, about how someone makes you feel which counts and just how important that is. I hope to bring that more into my own everyday life, as a loving, happy feeling reflects back to yourself. What you have achieved is wonderful and will help many people.

    Like

  39. Hello Wendy – I just finished your uplifting book and wanted to thank you for the experience of viewing dementia through your eyes – a sentence I never thought I would write! I have recommended your honest and powerful book to a coworker who just moved her mom out of her home of many years due to Alzheimer’s disease – I know it will give her courage and comfort, and a few chuckles too! Thank you for sharing your story with the world.

    Liked by 1 person

  40. Alzheimer’s illness is common in my family, I have been stressed at work for at least 16 years suffered depression my thoughts were blocked. So I knew the need to keep a watch on it, that was when I began to walk several times a week, 2 miles a day and realized that was a positive thing, but it got to a point my whole body started getting weaker, I needed some help. I started up training, the trainer came to my hometown 5 times a week and he told me that would be able to help me. I agreed with him and was happy I finally found solution not until I woke up one day and couldn’t walk. Tried out so many medications and diet but none of them was able to help me. In the process I knew about ZOMO, an herbal medicine for Alzheimer’s disease, I followed the blog address shared; I curiously contacted him and got ZOMO. I didn’t want to be disabled at my old age, and was so hungry for more healthy days on earth. My recovery involved both medicine and diet. I never had any complications I experienced while on English medications why using ZOMO. You may contact Dr. Charanjit via his email. charantova@gmail.com or visit his blog via curetoalzheimer.blogspot.com

    Liked by 1 person

  41. Hi Wendy. We are both 79 and my wife was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s at 74. She is still at home, and I got your book through Dementia Australia. I thought it was inspirational, because it gave me a far better understanding of what my wife might be going through, and feeling. She doesn’t read much any more because she forgets what she read yesterday, but nevertheless I’m wondering about suggesting she read it too.

    Dementia Australia say that your book is the first one ever written by someone living with dementia, so it provides me with a perspective that I have not seen before.

    Keep up the excellent work [on committees, enquiries, research, blogs etc.], because thousands of people around the world like my wife and myself really appreciate it.

    Regards, Barry

    Barry Blight
    558 New St
    Brighton
    Victoria, 3186
    Australia

    Liked by 1 person

  42. Hi Wendy, I started reading your book yesterday & I can’t put it down so am already half way through. Thank you so much for sharing your story & I think all that you do is amazing. My Mum has Alzheimer’s Disease, she is 80 & was diagnosed in her mid 70’s. Also, my best friend has just been diagnosed with early onset, she is 56. It has taken a long time for her diagnosis as unfortunately she wasn’t co-operating with any of the testing required. I noticed symptoms in my friend at least 5 years ago so her onset must’ve started in her very early 50’s. I am so thankful for your book & now I have just discovered your blog I will follow you, caring thoughts your way x

    Liked by 1 person

      1. …….Thank you again Wendy for all you are doing to raise awareness & help research. I have been glued to the rest of your book today (a cold, wet & windy day here it is our Winter, perfect for reading) so I have just finished it, such a beautifully written book & I must admit I was moved to tears at times during it 😘 Xx

        Liked by 1 person

  43. Wendy, thank you. I’m not alone anymore and will reread when I’m sad. Have used some coping techniques on my own.now have more ideas to add. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  44. Thank you Wendy for your book, it was a must read and I have already recommended it to everyone I know, because everyone my age (60) or younger will have to deal with someone they love having dementia sooner or later! My best friend (10 years older ) recommend the book ( her book group read it and everyone raved about it, best book for the year ) I think it has been a wonderful book, well writen and insightful! However my thanks goes out to you as my best friend ( and someone I love very much) worries and has worried about dementia for many years now! Her mother died last year after many years with it. From reading your book I think she has found more peace with it, she is now concentrating on what she can do ( which is a great deal) and not worrying as much about what she has lost! Thank you for this gift to her, and for sharing so much of you!

    Liked by 1 person

  45. Hi Wendy,

    I recently your book and just wanted to take the time to say how inspiring and moving I found your story, or should I say your attitude and the actions you have taken and continue to take to maintain your independence. Your humour and love for York reminds me of my own family members.

    Thank you for sharing your amazing story and giving people a better insight into how it feels to have dementia and what can be done to make the best of it. I’ve finding it very hard to effectively put words to paper to say just how amazing I found your journey!

    I wish you and your girls all the best.

    Liked by 1 person

  46. Wendy, I am in the middle of your book. I love the pictures of Billy, he is beautiful. I picked up your book for a couple of reasons. I have a step mom who is in the mid to late stages of Dementia. I have worried that I may be in the very early stages. I am now 55. I have always been proud of my memory and now my short term memory is spotty at best. If it is out of sight it is out of mind. I have not had any testing so I am not sure but I have written down the thins I have noticed. I love that you are sharing your journey it inspires me.

    Liked by 1 person

  47. Hello Wendy,
    I just finished reading your book and have been left so inspired by your strength and courage.
    What reasonated the most for me was you stating that you may not remember the person but you do remember how that person makes you feel.
    I am recommending your book to everyone I know in hopes that people will learn to be more accepting and compassionate towards others.

    The best to you and your daughters. You’re one special woman, Wendy.

    Sincerely,
    Holly McCarty

    Liked by 1 person

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